BPC Shelton – Letter to Community

Dear Community, On February 20th, 2018, we hosted the first ever Black Prisoners’ Caucus sponsored youth summit at the Washington Correction Center in Shelton, WA. Over 125 members of the community came and supported this summit. Our aim with this summit was to have a positive impact on the communities we came from. As men who have been in prison reflecting on the bad decisions we made which led to our incarceration, and often times damaged communities we came from, we wanted to give back. Those of you from the community who joined us were to be conduits through which
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Black Prisoners’ Caucus Youth Summit (Shelton)

Originally posted at http://www.doc.wa.gov/news/2018/02232018.htm February 23, 2018 By DOC Communications (email) SHELTON – The Black Prisoners Caucus (BPC) at the Washington Corrections Center in Shelton hosted a Youth Summit. The panel was comprised of 11 incarcerated men who shared their stories of what led to their incarceration. The men also shared their recommendations for the 125 community partners in attendance on how their work with youth could impact and decrease incarceration rates. The community members included representation from youth detention centers, prosecutors, professors, juvenile advocates, Village of Hope staff, local Boys and Girls Club representatives and legislatures. No youth were
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BPC 2018 Annual Youth Summit

Black Prisoners’ Caucus – Shelton is holding their annual Youth Summit. This summit is organized and facilitated by the BPC – Shelton Youth Committee. This summit is for educators, administrators, service providers and community members working with youth/young adults that want to learn and become a partner in this work. All guests must be pre-approved through a security screening process. If you are interested in attending please send your Full Name, Date of Birth, Place of Birth, and Last 4 Digits of your social security number to bpcsummit@gmail.com by January 31st. Please also include a phone number, email address and if you would like
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Prisoners taking TEACH-ING to a whole new level

The idea of using college course in Arts, Humanities, Natural and Social Sciences as a tool for prison reform can be seen as progressive, but when the same classes are being taught by prisoners to the inmate population as a way of creating a liberating learning community that is committed to reform, it becomes more that progressive it becomes revolutionary! TEACH was created in 2013 as a college program that started off offering college level classes like world literature, biology and college math at Clallam Bay Corrections Center. TEACH, which is an acronym for Taking Education And Creating History, was
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Letter to the community – BPC Clallam Bay

Dear Community and Educators, This letter is written by the Black Prisoners’ Caucus in the essence of truth, love and an endless thirst for cultural refinement and education. Therefore, we hope that this letter is received in good health and great spirits. As the BPC, we are organized to promote the growth and development of African Americans inside the Washington State prison system. We encourage cultural competency among all prisoners, spiritual growth, education and literacy as a way to bridge the cultural divide that prevents prisoners from collectively working together. The BPC helps men strengthen their values so they can
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Black Prisoners’ Caucus 2017 Family Summit

“The True Cost of Incarceration” October 7th, 2017 9am – 3pm Shiloh Baptist Church 1211 South I Street Tacoma, WA 98405 Details to come….. This event is supported by families, faith, and community organizations throughout Washington State. For more information or questions contact: Cassandra 509-385-7040 or Satori 206-466-7288
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Guest Post: Reflections from the Black Prisoner’s Caucus, Monroe Correctional Facility

Seattle Teacher Residency – Guest Post: Reflections from the Black Prisoner’s Caucus, Monroe Correctional Facility Orignally posted at http://www.seattleteacherresidency.org/guest-post-reflections-from-the-black-prisoners-caucus-monroe-correctional-facility/ “Have you ever been in a prison before?” Miss Janet, a woman that the prison officials call a “sponsor,” asked me.  This seasoned visitor must have seen some apprehension in my face or body language. “No,” I answered.  I was a bit anxious. Walking into Monroe Correctional Facility can be intimidating.  “You’re safe,” she reassured me.  Shortly after that, we were escorted into a large room where several chairs were arranged in a circle.  It was there, after 13 years in
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Creating a college behind bars

Originally posted at https://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Justice/2016/1202/Creating-a-college-behind-bars How inmates in Washington State are trying to improve their lives so they can cope better after they’re released from prison. December 16, 2016 by Ann Scott Tyson CLALLAM BAY, WASH. — Up a lonely road lined with signs warning drivers not to pick up hitchhikers, on a hilltop surrounded by forest, the Clallam Bay Corrections Center at the northwest tip of Washington State feels like the ends of the earth. Yet behind the high walls and concertina wire, inmate Kimonti Carter is spending his 20th year behind bars striving for learning and connection. “We want to
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Coding bootcamp aims to keep people out of prison

Originally posted at http://crosscut.com/2016/08/can-coding-create-a-future-for-people-behind-bars/ August 9, 2016 by Caroline Halter If the increasing popularity of coding bootcamps is any indication, more and more people are looking at computer science as a pathway to job security and higher earnings. But what if coding could help break the cycle of incarceration, an issue that affects more than two million Americans each year? This is the idea behind Unloop, a nonprofit that aims to train inmates in Washington prisons to become entry-level web developers. Co-founded by David Almeida — who has spent the last four years working on business strategy at Microsoft — the
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Chipping Away at the Cultural Wall

Originally posted at http://www.doc.wa.gov/news/2016/02282016.htm February 28, 2016 By Andrew Garber DOC Communications 5 TEACH students (Tim Kelly , DOC Communications) CLALLAM BAY – Behind the concertina wire and concrete walls, dozens of inmates gather in classrooms each day to discuss math, politics, religion, history and even creative writing. While some of the classes are for college credit, most are held just for the sake of learning. And the courses are rapidly growing in popularity among inmates, who credit them not only with increasing their understanding of the world, but also with breaking down racial and cultural barriers. “It’s helping us bridge gaps,” said
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